This section presents a unique group of activities, which have been designed to develop numeracy skills. These activities help to improve: trust, leadership, cooperation, patience, teamwork, life skills, subtraction, addition, and estimating.

Scavenger Hunt

Discovering a new place could be done by exploring for certain items. The aim of scavenger hunt is to use your hunting and counting skills.

Natural Quantities

The woodland has loads of resources for you to create great quantities in either the soil, or on top of the soil. The aim of natural quantities is look into two activities; 'show me' and fraction wall.

Hunt for Natural Colours

'Hunt for natural colours' is a superb outdoor activity suitable for young children of all abilities. The aim of hunt for natural colours is to use your hunting and counting skills.

Number Logs

'Number logs' uses natural materials and crosses them with numbers. The aim of number logs is to use your sawing and counting skills.

American Style Buttermilk Biscuits

Following a recipe can be tricky but creating something from numbers and instructions can be really satisfying. The aim of this activity is to make biscuits by following a recipe.

Cinnamon Sugar Doughnuts

'Cinnamon sugar doughnuts' are very tasty to eat, they are even satisfying to make too. The aim of cinnamon sugar doughnuts is to make doughnuts by following a recipe.

Counting Stick

'Counting stick' will really help improve your number skills. The aim of this session is to use a stick to illustrate where certain numbers should be placed.

Treasure Hunt Counting

'Treasure hunt counting' is a variation on scavenger hunt. The aim of treasure hunt counting is to match numbers with natural materials.

Number Swap

'Number Swap' is a team oriented outdoor activity suitable for young children of all abilities. The aim of number swap is to understand where numbers have to be and order them correctly.

How many steps?

'How many steps?' gets people to come together to estimate distances. The aim of this activity is to count steps and use that figure to try and estimate a number of steps needed to reach a fixed point in the distance.